This Election Cycle

November 13, 2008

inspector121This election cycle, more than any other before, has been influenced by New Media – the internet, blogs, social networking, and other things that have only become wide-spread in use and access. With how new these things are, anyone has been able to comment on anything and everything, and many more people are getting attention from people around the world.

Many events have influenced this election, but I’d like to highlight a few that showed how the internet and new media have changed the election process.

3. Bridge to Nowhere/Alaska and Russia

Palin’s statements have been a dominate meme since the Republican National Convention – especially these two. Even after the election is over (albeit for just more a week), jokes are still made about bridges and “I can see [insert country] from my house!” We’ll have to wait and see how long they will last, but I doubt that they will fade quickly.

2. “The fundamentals of our economy are strong”

While not as prevalent a meme, this phrase made its own circuit of the internet and the blogs and eventually moved to the more traditional media outlets. It continued to be pulled back out during debates and the worst part of the economic crisis – beit an economic or a political “worst”, however you personally interpret it.

[A related cirulation was the idea of suspending a campaign (or, for joke purposes, homework, assignments, break times, or any number of things), but this was not a new media centered event, it deserves only a mention, but not its own entry.]

1. “That One”

round-sticker

In one of the greatest moments of new media and this election, mere hours – between the end of the debate and the next morning, easily – www.thatone08.com was up and running, selling T-shirts and showing videos using the phrase – and making fun of it, of course. While, in the end, it might not have played that large of a role in the result of the election, it was a perfect example of new media commenting on and affecting the political process, specifically media made of people working from home – people who were perhaps not professional bloggers or writers and were just politically active and aware, and had the tools and put in the time to do what they could.

As a student, a writer, and a blogger, this has been an amazing experience – both to watch the amazing things that people like myself have done, and to do a small part myself in working within the democratic process.

But, to end on a different note, I would like to send a thank you to Rachel Maddow for sticking up for those of us who blog in our pajamas from home – though I must say that not everyone has basements. They are a little impossible in coastal areas when I lived until college. 

Thank you all for an amazing election cycle, and goodnight!

-Inspector 121


Remember, remember…

November 4, 2008

v-for-vendettaOn the eve of one of the more auspicious nights of the year, I thought it fitting to remind everyone that if you refused to participate in a certain civic obligation I will not stand for even the slightest grumble from you. In short, vote.

With any luck someone should emerge victorious without consequence and find themselves at the helm of this great country.

-V


Let Them Eat Candy

October 31, 2008

I’ve spent some time counting (you know how much I love to count) after Cookie Monster and I conversed about Halloveen and the vonderful viral marketing campaign possibilities and I have some numbers for you to ponder, ah ah ah.

Instead of spending money on television ads, McCain might have better spent it creating some custom M&M’s to hand out to children on Halloveen. The Mars Candy Company has a vonderful vebsite vhere you can create candies with custom messages.

Let us start by counting the money McCain spent this past week in Florida on television advertisements. Let’s see, one, 100 thousand. Two, 200 thousand. Two hundred twenty-eight, 228 thousand dollars, ah ah ah. Now ve take this number and count the packages of specially created M&M’s that could be purchased at $1.79 each. Five, five thousand. Thirty-five, 35,000. One hundred thirty-five, 135,000, McCain can buy 135,000 units, ah ah ah. These could then be dispersed amongst households to give out during the vitching hours of Halloween night.

Compared to the measly 416 units of ad time McCain bought vith that 228k I think the M&M’s would be much more effective, creative, and tasty vay to penetrate a target audience who is no longer paying attention to political ads.

-The Count


Subliminal Candy

October 31, 2008

Cookies!!! The last thing this election has left is Halloween…..And what does every body do for Halloween? Little kids go out and get candy, they come home, eat a bit of it and the parents take the rest of it away so the kids won’t get sick!! Me do anything for cookie!

An idea given to me just by watching James Kotecki, the candy is a wonderful way to get to children…. Subliminal messaging!!!! Just for Halloween on election years!! Everyone knows you can specialize M&Ms and put whatever you want on them and you can buy as much as you want….Me sure if either candidate decides to want to do some last minute campaigning, candy….cookies!!!!!….are the way to go!!!!

Me sure with enough money, a candidate could buy enough candy and buy lots of candy companies to make candy wrappers with them on it and put some kind of message on all the candy and chocolate and cookies to give subliminal messages to the kids….

Then the parents take the candy away and see the wrappers, and though they don’t think anything of it….. The kids will take out the candy often enough, and for the littlest kids, the parents will have to clean up after them and will see the wrappers some more…..Then the subliminal messaging will get to the parents….

Interesting idea, no? C is for Cookie and that’s good enough for me!!!

-Cookie Monster


What Obama Left Out

October 29, 2008

Watching Barack Obama’s 30 minute ad before the final game of the 2008 World Series (congrats to the Phillies) I couldn’t help but notice Barack left something out. Throughout the entirety of the advertisement, I never heard Obama mention his opponent. Instead, Obama focused in on real American families facing real American issues and explained how he will solve these problems.

This has always been the quality I have admired most about Obama’s campaign; Obama’s ability to focus on himself and his plans for change instead of trying to cut into his opponent.

Despite all of the attempts to discredit Obama’s vie for the White House it seems like none of them are the kryptonite that can take him down. I look forward to November 5th when Obama can don the mantle of President of the United States and start making the change this country is clamoring (or dare I say Hoping) for.

-Captain America


Coming to a Close: We Are All One Nation

October 28, 2008

You’ve gotta hand it to the man, he knows how to present a speech.

With this race coming to close, each candidate is throwing (or not throwing) their final punches, hoping to come out on top. As the nation looks forward to a week from now, I’d like to take a moment to look back, and see when Barack Obama first appeared nationally, when the senator from Illinois captured the attention of many, and first began the path that has led to today – a day when we wait to see if we are going to elect the first black President, not because he’s black, but because he has given the people hope for change and faith in our own power.

I remember Obama’s speech at the 2004 DNC, and his message hasn’t changed in the four years since.

I remember the beginning. Do you?


McCain/Palin – Nearing the End

October 28, 2008

The race is coming down to its last few days of early voting, and is only a week away from the climax of November fourth, and I felt the need to take a look at the latest statements from the GOP candidates, kupo.

First, after learning about the $150,000 spent on clothes and accessories for the Palin family, McCain says that Palin is “frugal”, kupo, and that a third of the money was given back and the clothes will be auctioned for charity. Now, even if they gave back $50,000, that is still a huge amount of money, kupo. Enough for my guild to pay for supplies for years, so imagine what it could buy for the regular citizens – the soccer moms and “Joe Six Pack”, if you will, kupo.

And it’s very different to say such things when you talk about where you shop, kupo. Some places are insanely expensive, while others are more reasonably priced for the exact same thing – or at least something comprable. Frugal is defined as “economical in use or expenditure; prudently saving or sparing; not wasteful” by dictionary.com. If we’re determined to not “waste money” on grizzly bears and other earmarks, let’s not waste money on clothes and accessories either, okay, kupo?

Secondly, two big, important words, kupo. International crisis. I’m not sure if I’d call it a complete gaffe, kupo, but Sen. Biden’s rather unpolished phrasing was at one point the McCain camp’s new message, kupo. McCain came up with a retaliation that potentially could have worked, but unfortunately hasn’t been able to control how the new message has been used, kupo – and, taken out of context (like Sen. Biden’s comment) – sounds a lot worse for the person speaking than they would normally expect. And it really doesn’t help that National Security experts agree with your opponent. Kupo!

And lastly, it also really hurts when the people you thought you could depend on desert your cause, kupo. It’s not just a few either, kupo! It’s people who are at the top of the party, have most of the information, and those with political power who are jumping ship quickly. I hope that my guild never ends up like that, kupo.

Regardless, what do you think of the building party-desertion, and the early voting exit polls, kupo? Too bad no one cares to do exit polls in Texas, kupo.

– Moogle